12 Arrowwood Court South Portland Maine

12 Arrowwood Court South Portland Maine
Under Contract!!

Friday, November 26, 2010

Safe Home for Christmas and the Holidays

Home Safe Home


The holidays should be a magical time for children. Yet each year, hospital emergency rooms treat about 8700 people for injuries, such as falls, cuts and shocks, related to holiday lights, decorations and Christmas trees.



Keep the season merry with this list of safety tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.



Safer Trees and Decorations



•When purchasing an artificial tree, look for the label "Fire Resistant." Although this label does not mean the tree won't catch fire, it does indicate the tree will resist burning and should extinguish quickly.

•When purchasing a live tree, check for freshness. A fresh tree is green, needles are hard to pull from branches and when bent between your fingers, needles do not break. The trunk butt of a fresh tree is sticky with resin, and when tapped on the ground, the tree should not lose many needles.

•When setting up a tree at home, place it away from fireplaces and radiators. Because heated rooms dry live trees out rapidly, be sure to keep the stand filled with water. Place the tree out of the way of traffic and do not block doorways.

•Cut a few inches off the trunk of your tree to expose the fresh wood. This allows for better water absorption and will help to keep your tree from drying out and becoming a fire hazard.

•Use only noncombustible or flame-resistant materials to trim a tree. Choose tinsel or artificial icicles of plastic or nonleaded metals. Leaded materials are hazardous if ingested by children.

•Never use lighted candles on a tree or near other evergreens. Always use nonflammable holders and place candles out of children's reach.

•Take special care to avoid decorations that are sharp or breakable, keep trimmings with small removable parts out of the reach of children to avoid the child swallowing or inhaling small pieces, and avoid trimmings that resemble candy or food, which may tempt a child to eat them.

•Wear gloves to avoid eye and skin irritation while decorating with spun glass "angel hair." Follow container directions carefully to avoid lung irritation while decorating with artificial-snow sprays.



Bright Ideas for Lights



•Indoors or outside, always use lights that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory that indicates conformance with safety standards.

•Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections, and throw out damaged sets.

•Use no more than three standard-size sets of lights per single extension cord.

•Never use electric lights on a metallic tree. The tree can become charged with electricity from faulty lights, and a person touching a branch could be electrocuted.

•Before using lights outdoors, check labels to be sure they have been certified for outdoor use.

•Fasten outdoor lights securely to trees, house walls, or other firm supports to protect the lights from wind damage. Use insulated staples to hold strings in place, not nails or tacks. Or run strings of lights through hooks (available at hardware stores).

•Plug all outdoor electric decorations into circuits with ground fault circuit interrupters to avoid potential shocks.

•Turn off all lights when you go to bed or leave the house. The lights could short out and start a fire.



Friendlier Fireplaces



•Use care with "fire salts," which produce colored flames when thrown on wood fires. They contain heavy metals that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation and vomiting if eaten. Keep them away from children.

•Do not burn wrapping papers in the fireplace. A flash fire may result, as wrappings ignite suddenly and burn intensely.

•Before lighting any fire, remove all greens, boughs, papers, and other decorations from fireplace area. Check to see that the flue is open.

Home Safe Home


The holidays should be a magical time for children. Yet each year, hospital emergency rooms treat about 8700 people for injuries, such as falls, cuts and shocks, related to holiday lights, decorations and Christmas trees.



Keep the season merry with this list of safety tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.



Safer Trees and Decorations



•When purchasing an artificial tree, look for the label "Fire Resistant." Although this label does not mean the tree won't catch fire, it does indicate the tree will resist burning and should extinguish quickly.

•When purchasing a live tree, check for freshness. A fresh tree is green, needles are hard to pull from branches and when bent between your fingers, needles do not break. The trunk butt of a fresh tree is sticky with resin, and when tapped on the ground, the tree should not lose many needles.

•When setting up a tree at home, place it away from fireplaces and radiators. Because heated rooms dry live trees out rapidly, be sure to keep the stand filled with water. Place the tree out of the way of traffic and do not block doorways.

•Cut a few inches off the trunk of your tree to expose the fresh wood. This allows for better water absorption and will help to keep your tree from drying out and becoming a fire hazard.

•Use only noncombustible or flame-resistant materials to trim a tree. Choose tinsel or artificial icicles of plastic or nonleaded metals. Leaded materials are hazardous if ingested by children.

•Never use lighted candles on a tree or near other evergreens. Always use nonflammable holders and place candles out of children's reach.

•Take special care to avoid decorations that are sharp or breakable, keep trimmings with small removable parts out of the reach of children to avoid the child swallowing or inhaling small pieces, and avoid trimmings that resemble candy or food, which may tempt a child to eat them.

•Wear gloves to avoid eye and skin irritation while decorating with spun glass "angel hair." Follow container directions carefully to avoid lung irritation while decorating with artificial-snow sprays.



Bright Ideas for Lights



•Indoors or outside, always use lights that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory that indicates conformance with safety standards.

•Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections, and throw out damaged sets.

•Use no more than three standard-size sets of lights per single extension cord.

•Never use electric lights on a metallic tree. The tree can become charged with electricity from faulty lights, and a person touching a branch could be electrocuted.

•Before using lights outdoors, check labels to be sure they have been certified for outdoor use.

•Fasten outdoor lights securely to trees, house walls, or other firm supports to protect the lights from wind damage. Use insulated staples to hold strings in place, not nails or tacks. Or run strings of lights through hooks (available at hardware stores).

•Plug all outdoor electric decorations into circuits with ground fault circuit interrupters to avoid potential shocks.

•Turn off all lights when you go to bed or leave the house. The lights could short out and start a fire.


Friendlier Fireplaces



•Use care with "fire salts," which produce colored flames when thrown on wood fires. They contain heavy metals that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation and vomiting if eaten. Keep them away from children.

•Do not burn wrapping papers in the fireplace. A flash fire may result, as wrappings ignite suddenly and burn intensely.

•Before lighting any fire, remove all greens, boughs, papers, and other decorations from fireplace area. Check to see that the flue is open.
http://www.rd.com/home-garden/christmas-safety-checklist/article15322.html

Christmas at the Victoria Mansion








Don't miss this fabulous home all decked out for a Victorian Christmas!
http://www.victoriamansion.org/events.html

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

RE/MAX By The Bay at Maine Red Claws

The Maine Red Claws 2010/11 season has begun so if you are a basketball fan, get over to the Portland Expo and enjoy one of their home games.

Friday, November 12, 2010

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine



134. David's restaurant in South Portland offers fine cuisine in a cosy comfortable atmosphere. The food is freshly prepared in the open kitchen.
I tried the bacon cheeseburger on foccacia with truffle-oiled handcut fries and my husband got a glazed salmon dish.  Both were excellent, plus we were entertained by a jazz duo.
The bread is delicious strips  with plenty of oil and seasonings.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine

133. The Blue Spoon Restaurant on upper Congress street in Portland has a great lunch menu and was not very crowded at noon.  The decor is pleasant and relaxing.  I tried a hearty white bean and sausage soup with chewy bread and olive oil for dipping.  Francine had the seafood chowder which included muscles and shrimp.  Delicious!

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine


132.Antiques USA in Arundel--  Large group antique shop with loads of merchandise, open 362 days a year.  This shop has something for everyone including furniture.  http://antiquesusamaine.com/

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Master Closet Organization and Layout

By: Oliver Marks

Published: November 4, 2010

Master closet organization creates ample space for one or two users and includes storage features to make the space easy to arrange and maintain.

Effort Med 2-10 days
Investment Med $800-$5,000


A 10x10 closet should provide enough space for two people's needs, plus enough elbow room to reach everything comfortably.
Remodeling a master bedroom, adding on a master suite, or building a new home all afford opportunities to create your ideal master closet. Use these organization and storage ideas to develop your personalized plan of action.

Expect to pay $1,500 to $5,000 and up to equip a 8x10 foot, well-outfitted walk-in closet, assuming you hire a pro to build the room as part of a master suite addition. A DIY installation costs at least $800.

Layout and space requirements

A walk-in master closet should be a minimum of 7x10 feet, and preferably 10x10 feet for two users. That gives you space to line two or three walls with shelves, cubbies, and poles, and the elbow room to reach them easily.

For added convenience, include about 3x3 feet of floor space for a chair where you can perch to put on socks and fold laundry. If possible, leave enough room in the middle for a folding luggage table or built-in storage island with countertop, so you can open your suitcase when you’re packing for a trip.

Options for storage and organization

You could include a dresser in your master closet, but that isn’t the best way to store clothes. You can only see what’s on top of each drawer, and trying to pull a shirt from the bottom of the pile always leads to a jumbled, wrinkled mess.

A better option is a closet-organizing system. These storage units have an array of compartments, each designed for specific pieces of your wardrobe, from individual shelves and bins for sweaters and tops to small drawers for lingerie and accessories to cubbies or racks for shoes, bags, and hats.

The components for master closet organizing systems cost $800 to $5,000 or more, depending on whether you go with ready-made or custom-designed.

A former carpenter and newspaper reporter, Oliver Marks has been writing about home improvements for 16 years. He’s currently restoring his second fixer-upper with a mix of big hired projects and small do-it-himself jobs.


Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/articles/master-closet-organization-and-layout/#ixzz14oXTm7Ec

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine


This is an update on Gauchos Happy Hour.  Check out one of their signature martinis---the New England Patriot.  Only $5 until 6PM.

Saturday, November 6, 2010

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine

131. I tried a new restaurant that just opened on Friday in Falmouth.  HUGS is an Italian restaurant with some really delicious items.  Opening night was very crowded but with reservations we were seated fairly quickly.  It is small and close quarters but was quite festive.

The entrees come with a fresh salad bowl of mixed greens and olives and veggies with a very nice Italian style dressing.
The bread was scrumptious strips of chewy bread with pesto, parm, and pine nuts.



I had butternut squash ravioli with brown sugar sauce.  My husband got a salmon dish with pasta and spinach.  Both were yummy.

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine


130. I have mentioned Friday Night Art Walk before but this night I found a wonderful piece of art at a small group galley on Congress Street.  I bought one of a series of cat prints ---Rex, the Communication Specialist---from artist Bridget McAlonan from Topsham.  Check out her blog at http://www.bridgetmcalonan.com/

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

Portland Deal alert:

The Portland Pie company in Portland has a great deal on wine:

50% OFF bottles of wine Monday-Wednesday As a Special thanks exclusively for our Frequent Pie-er Rewards Club members! Come in to your favorite Portland Pie location and enjoy any of the fabulous bottles on our wine list, at half off! Offer good anytime Monday-Wednesday as long as you’re a Frequent Pie-er!
http://www.portlandpie.com/frequent-pie-er/

How To Prepare Your House For Sale

By Elizabeth Weintraub, http://homebuying.about.com/od/sellingahouse/ht/homeprep.htm
Prepping and staging a house. Every seller wants her home to sell fast and bring top dollar. Does that sound good to you? Well, it's not luck that makes that happen. It's careful planning and knowing how to professionally spruce up your home that will send home buyers scurrying for their checkbooks. Here is how to prep a house and turn it into an irresistible and marketable home.

Difficulty: Average

Time Required: Seven to 10 Days

Here's How:

Disassociate Yourself With Your Home.

Say to yourself, "This is not my home; it is a house -- a product to be sold much like a box of cereal on the grocery store shelf.

Make the mental decision to "let go" of your emotions and focus on the fact that soon this house will no longer be yours.

Picture yourself handing over the keys and envelopes containing appliance warranties to the new owners!

Say goodbye to every room.

Don't look backwards -- look toward the future.


De-Personalize.

Pack up those personal photographs and family heirlooms. Buyers can't see past personal artifacts, and you don't want them to be distracted. You want buyers to imagine their own photos on the walls, and they can't do that if yours are there! You don't want to make any buyer ask, "I wonder what kind of people live in this home?" You want buyers to say, "I can see myself living here."


De-Clutter!

People collect an amazing quantity of junk. Consider this: if you haven't used it in over a year, you probably don't need it.

If you don't need it, why not donate it or throw it away?

Remove all books from bookcases.

Pack up those knickknacks.

Clean off everything on kitchen counters.

Put essential items used daily in a small box that can be stored in a closet when not in use.

Think of this process as a head-start on the packing you will eventually need to do anyway.


Rearrange Bedroom Closets and Kitchen Cabinets.

Buyers love to snoop and will open closet and cabinet doors. Think of the message it sends if items fall out! Now imagine what a buyer believes about you if she sees everything organized. It says you probably take good care of the rest of the house as well. This means:

Alphabetize spice jars.

Neatly stack dishes.

Turn coffee cup handles facing the same way.

Hang shirts together, buttoned and facing the same direction.

Line up shoes.


Rent a Storage Unit.


Almost every home shows better with less furniture. Remove pieces of furniture that block or hamper paths and walkways and put them in storage. Since your bookcases are now empty, store them. Remove extra leaves from your dining room table to make the room appear larger. Leave just enough furniture in each room to showcase the room's purpose and plenty of room to move around. You don't want buyers scratching their heads and saying, "What is this room used for?"


Remove/Replace Favorite Items.

If you want to take window coverings, built-in appliances or fixtures with you, remove them now. If the chandelier in the dining room once belonged to your great grandmother, take it down. If a buyer never sees it, she won't want it. Once you tell a buyer she can't have an item, she will covet it, and it could blow your deal. Pack those items and replace them, if necessary.


Make Minor Repairs.

Replace cracked floor or counter tiles.

Patch holes in walls.

Fix leaky faucets.

Fix doors that don't close properly and kitchen drawers that jam.

Consider painting your walls neutral colors, especially if you have grown accustomed to purple or pink walls.

(Don't give buyers any reason to remember your home as "the house with the orange bathroom.")

Replace burned-out light bulbs.

If you've considered replacing a worn bedspread, do so now!


Make the House Sparkle!


Wash windows inside and out.

Rent a pressure washer and spray down sidewalks and exterior.

Clean out cobwebs.

Re-caulk tubs, showers and sinks.

Polish chrome faucets and mirrors.

Clean out the refrigerator.

Vacuum daily.

Wax floors.

Dust furniture, ceiling fan blades and light fixtures.

Bleach dingy grout.

Replace worn rugs.

Hang up fresh towels.

Bathroom towels look great fastened with ribbon and bows.

Clean and air out any musty smelling areas. Odors are a no-no.


Scrutinize.

Go outside and open your front door. Stand there. Do you want to go inside? Does the house welcome you?

Linger in the doorway of every single room and imagine how your house will look to a buyer.

Examine carefully how furniture is arranged and move pieces around until it makes sense.

Make sure window coverings hang level.

Tune in to the room's statement and its emotional pull. Does it have impact and pizzazz?

Does it look like nobody lives in this house? You're almost finished.


Check Curb Appeal.

If a buyer won't get out of her agent's car because she doesn't like the exterior of your home, you'll never get her inside.

Keep the sidewalks cleared.

Mow the lawn.

Paint faded window trim.

Plant yellow flowers or group flower pots together. Yellow evokes a buying emotion. Marigolds are inexpensive.

Trim your bushes.

Make sure visitors can clearly read your house number.

Monday, November 1, 2010

101 Things I Love about Portland Maine

129. Wild Willy's Burgers:  These burger restaurants are located in South Portland and York and several other places.  The burgers are big and juicy and done they way you request.  I get a small side order of onion rings for a dollar which gives you 3 or 4.  They have a free Portland newspaper so you can relax and listen to the player piano. http://www.wildwillysburgers.com/territories.cfm